Adulting 101: Transferrable Skills

In part 2 of our Adulting 101 Series, we are going to talk about “transferrable skills.” These skills are useful during your studies, and will be important once you enter the workforce. They are also proficiencies you can put on your resume.
Start learning and implementing these skills now, and your future self will appreciate your present self!

Part 1: Time Management Skills

We only have 24 hours a day to spend, and we can only do limited activities within a day. When you have a lot to do, it becomes very important to allocate your time wisely in order to get as many things done as possible.
Effective time management skills not only help you balance your work, school, and personal lives, but also lets you multitask better.
Here is how you can implement time management skills into your life today. Click here to read our complete guide on time management skills.
1. Get an agenda or your calendar app on your phone. Make it a habit to use your agenda or calendar app by writing down your work shift, due dates, and doctor’s appointments.
2. Keep track of your to-do list, and decide what to prioritize in a day or a week. Plan ahead!

The Learning Portal also has various tips for time management. Download their free worksheets such as their assessment tracker and weekly calendar and start using them!

Part 2: Professional email writing

How we communicate with our friends and family differs greatly from the way we address business acquaintances, prospective employers, and people who hold a position of authority over us.
Professional email writing gives you a good first impression to your prospective employer, makes you appear more competent, and lets you access better job opportunities. When you are deciding which tone you would like your email to have, consider the impression you would like to leave with the recipient. It is always better to be more formal than not formal enough.
We’ve made a step-by-step guide for professional email writing. Do start using this way of email-writing right away!

Here are other articles on professional email writing:
– NAU Canada Online: Tips for Writing Emails for All Situations
– Grammarly blogs: How to Start an Email and How to End an Email
– HubPost: How to Craft Effective Emails for International Teams

Part 3: computer skills

Almost all office jobs, whether part-time, full-time, entry-level or intermediate, do require you to have computer skills. In this section, we will focus on three skills: Office 365, typing, and keyboard shortcuts.

1. Office 365
One of the most important computer skills is Microsoft Office Programs, or Office 365. A lot of companies use Microsoft Office programs, such as Outlook, Word, Excel and PowerPoint, to perform everyday duties.
Did you know that you have access to Office 365 from your school email address? You can start using your Office 365 account today! Follow this guide and start using your account regularly!

2. Typing
Another important computer skill is typing. You might have seen job posts that include 40 wpm as one of their qualifications. WPM is an abbreviation of “Words per Minute”; it refers to how fast and accurately you type in one minute. The higher WPM count is, the better.
Do you want to test out your current typing speed now? Click here to test your ability now!
Do you want to improve your typing speed? Access TypingClub today to learn how to type faster, and without looking at your keyboard.

3. Keyboard Shortcuts
The last skill we would like to introduce is computer shortcuts. Almost every laptop and websites have different sets of shortcuts for different functions and features. Knowing these shortcuts can also help you type faster.
This website covers most of them. If you use a Mac as your laptop, make sure to learn shortcuts for both Mac and Windows as most jobs require you to use Windows.

Questions?

PrepStep offers various courses for transferrable skills! Access the Library Centre on Schoology for more information, and browse the resources at your own pace.

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